Scott Nicolay

Ana Kai Tangata

Tag: Man of His Time

H.P. Lovecraft and Racism Panel from Necronomicon Providence| The Outer Dark: Special Presentation — AUGUST 22, 2015

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“H.P. Lovecraft and Racism: Moving Past the Howies.” A Special Presentation of the Panel at NecronomiCon Providence, Sat. Aug. 22, 2015.

Moderator: Niels Hobbs. Panelists: C. Morgan Grefe, Andrew Leman, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, David Nickle, Faye Ringel.

Panel Description: Lovecraft was a racist. Whether you believe that his racism was only privately expressed in letters (and somehow ignore the racist aspects of his stories) and that his views softened later in life, his racism is now an undeniable aspect of his known personality. So how can we respond to this in a productive manner, and create a weird fiction community that is welcoming of diverse voices? Within this discussion, panelists will explore how Lovecraft’s racism shaped his work, and how contemporary fans can still love the craft without necessarily loving the views.

This archival episode will be available again at This Is Horror soon. In the meantime, subscribe at iTunes  or Blubrry to make sure you don’t miss an episode.

More Links:

https://davidnickle.blogspot.com/2014/08/dont-mention-war-some-thoughts-on-hp.html

https://www.silviamoreno-garcia.com/blog/necronomicon/

https://www.rifuture.org/lovecrafts-racism-a-tough-issue-at-necronomicon-providence.html

https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2015/08/hp-lovecraft-125/401471/

https://www.salon.com/2014/09/11/its_ok_to_admit_that_h_p_lovecraft_was_racist/

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/dec/09/move-over-hp-lovecraft-black-fantasy-writers-are-coming-through

Photo credit: Todd Chicoine

 NEXT WEEK’S GUESTS:  s.j. bagley and Simon Strantzas discuss new critical journal Thinking Horror.

Chesya Burke: Strange Crimes and Dangerous Women | The Outer Dark: Episode 8 — AUGUST 17, 2015

 Strange-Case-or-Little-Africa-187x300Chesya Burke delves deeply into the stories from her first collection Let’s Play White and her new novel The Strange Crimes of Little Africa, forthcoming from Rothco Press this fall (a mystery set in the dynamic cultural milieu of Harlem Renaissance which features Zora Neale Hurston as a character), intersectional feminism in the African-American context with strong female protagonists and supernatural powers as a force of empowerment, growing up with ghost stories in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, and reclaiming cultural traditions, open endings and returning characters, why she still loves zombies, reading and enjoying H.P. Lovecraft’s works but not flinching from the critical context of his racism, her doctorate studies in English, diversity and the future of speculative fiction, and her reading recommendations including Kiese Laymon and N.K. Jemisin.

This archival episode will be available again at This Is Horror soon. In the meantime, subscribe at iTunes  or Blubrry to make sure you don’t miss an episode.

NEXT WEEK’S GUEST:  Kate Jonez, author of Ceremony of Flies.

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